Important News for Affiliates of WCCL (My Publishers)

Important News for Affiliates of WCCL (My Publishers)

As many of you will know, at one time I wrote a number of courses for the electronic publishing house WCCL. Probably the best known of these is Write Any Book in Under 28 Days (also known as The Nick Daws Course).

I stopped working as a writer for WCCL a few years ago, and the company has since been taken over at least twice. The current owners are a company called Kaleidoscope Global. They are still selling my courses (along with many others). They are within their rights to do so, as WCCL purchased all rights in them a number of years ago. I remain an affiliate for the company, as basically it would be mad for me not to.

I know that a number of you are also affiliates of WCCL, which enables you to earn substantial profits (typically 50%) by marketing the company’s courses and other products. So I wanted to draw your attention today to the fact that the old affiliate platform is closing down and a new one has been launched at http://affiliates.kaleidoscopeglobal.com/.

I have been in touch with Kaleidoscope and they have told me that affiliate links created using the old platform at selfdevelopment.net will not go on working for much longer. So if you have banners or text links to any WCCL products containing your affiliate code, it’s essential to register on the new Kaleidoscope Global platform and get new links there.

If you are an active affiliate you should have received an email about this from the company a few weeks ago, but if not you can contact their affiliate manager via the website.

If you are not yet an affiliate and wish to join the program, you can apply via the Kaleidoscope Global website. The company is planning to launch a range of new products in the coming months, so there should be plenty to promote.

You can also, of course, promote any of their hundreds of older products (including my courses), but be aware that some of these have been on the market for ten years or more and I don’t know when they were last updated. Of my own courses, I am only actively promoting Write Any Book in Under 28 Days and Essential English for Authors currently, as these are basically evergreen titles. You can see a sample banner for Essential English for Authors at the foot of this post.

If you have any comments or questions, as ever, please do post them below.

If you enjoyed this post, please share it on your own blog or social media:
KDP jumpstart

KDP JumpStart: A New Resource for Amazon Ebook and Paperback Authors

Recently I got an email about KDP Jumpstart. This is a new training resource for Amazon authors using the KDP (Kindle Direct Publishing) platform. I thought I would take a look to see what it was all about.

KDP Jumpstart is a section of the KDP Help pages. At the start it says, “New to Kindle Direct Publishing? Want a simple, step-by-step guide to publishing on Amazon? We’ve created KDP Jumpstart for authors like you. KDP Jumpstart is a streamlined, sequential approach to the steps required to go from finished manuscript to published book.”

The KDP Jumpstart section is organized in four main categories, as follows:

  1. Getting Started
  2. Book Details
  3. Manuscript and Cover
  4. Rights and Pricing

Each of these categories contains between two and five pages. They provide a concise, step-by-step guide to the topic concerned, with short instructional videos as well as text (see example screen capture below). There are also companion PDFs you can download, which sum up the content in the form of a checklist.

KDP Jumpstart example

An important point is that KDP Jumpstart is based around using Amazon’s new (and free) Kindle Create tool. You can download this via KDP Jumpstart. Both PC and Mac versions are available. I downloaded the PC version and found it easy to install and intuitive to use.

I hadn’t actually seen Kindle Create before, so assume it is fairly new. Essentially, it aims to provide an easy-to-use software tool to format your Kindle e-books and make them look good before uploading them to Amazon. Among other things, it lets you apply enhanced typesetting to make text easier to read, and you can also select from a range of design themes to make your book look more professional.

There is also a Microsoft Word add-on you can download to help format paperback books for KDP. As I wrote in this post a few weeks ago, KDP paperback publishing looks set to replace Amazon’s old CreateSpace print-on-demand publishing service in the fairly near future.

I will look at Kindle Create in more detail in a future post, but my first impression is that it is well worth trying, as it should allow you to create Kindle e-books (and paperbacks) with better, more attractive formatting. A potential drawback may be that you will have to work within the constraints of the software – so if you have very specific formatting needs, it may not be for you.

If you have any comments or questions about KDP Jumpstart (or KDP Create), as always, please do post them below.

 

If you enjoyed this post, please share it on your own blog or social media:
Why All Freelance Writers Need Regular Clients

Why All Freelance Writers Need Regular Clients

A question I am asked quite regularly is how I have managed to sustain a freelance writing career for over thirty years.

There are various answers I could give to this, but probably the single most important factor has been having regular clients.

Over my career I have had somewhere in the region of thirty regular clients – people and companies who have supplied me with work over a lengthy period. As a matter of interest I have listed some of my main clients over the years below:

Maple Marketing (UK) Ltd – books and ebooks, distance learning courses and email newsletters

Streetwise – newsletter articles and training course content

Lagoon Games – puzzles, games, novelty books, quiz books, and so on

Agora (Fleet Street Publishing) – newsletter articles and web content (currently I am contributing two articles a week to their Creating Wealth email newsletter)

Hilite – newsletter articles, distance learning courses and web content

WCCL – distance learning courses, website content and copywriting

The Writers Bureau – distance learning courses and copywriting (I was also for several years a tutor and assessor for them)

Some of the above I’m still working for, others not – though my door is always open, of course!

Having regular clients has meant that almost every month I know there is some money coming in. Obviously I have also had other occasional and one-off clients, but I’d hate to have to rely on that to pay the bills.

For one thing, you get to know your ‘regulars’ and build a relationship with them. Good clients can be guaranteed to pay you for work done (even if once in a while their accounts department may need a prod). With new clients you simply don’t have that reassurance. They may be good, or nit-picking nightmares, or at worst downright crooks. When a potential new client approaches me these days, I am quite cautious before taking them on!

Regular clients are a lot less worry and hassle, and over the years I have developed strong working relationships and even friendships with some of them. This is great when, on occasion, you  need a little extra flexibility (over a deadline, say).

And of course, it makes work less stressful and more enjoyable.

And finally, if you have a core group of regular clients, you don’t need to spend so much time marketing your services. You can therefore concentrate on your writing, which is presumably what you enjoy doing, and also what you get paid for.

So my top advice to any writer starting out today would be to make every effort to build long-term relationships with clients. For me anyway this has been the key to sustaining a long career as a working professional freelance writer.

If you have any comments or questions, as always, please do post them below.

If you enjoyed this post, please share it on your own blog or social media: