Amazon

Now You Can Publish Kindle Ebooks as Paperbacks Through Kindle Direct Publishing

Now You Can Publish Kindle Ebooks as Paperbacks Through Kindle Direct Publishing

If you’re a Kindle author and haven’t logged into the KDP website recently, you may notice a new option on your Bookshelf.

There is now an option to publish your Kindle e-book as a print-on-demand (POD) paperback via the KDP site. This is quite separate from publishing on Amazon’s CreateSpace platform, incidentally.

I spent some time looking at what is on offer today, so here are my thoughts so far. To start with, it’s not just the case that you click a button and a paperback version is produced from the e-book. Some information is obviously carried over (book title, author name, publishing rights, and so on). However, the text and cover artwork have to be uploaded separately as new files. It does surprise me a bit that you can’t just import the existing text and format it for print, but there we are.

You can download various templates for your book from the KDP website info pages and edit these in Word or other software. Some guidance is provided for doing this, including a downloadable PDF manual. In my case KDP recommended that I use a 9 x 6 inch template. Both blank templates and templates with sample text are available via the KDP website.

Likewise, you can’t just automatically import your existing e-book cover. You have to either create and upload a print-ready PDF (you’ll need software such as Photo Shop to produce this) or use the KDP Cover Creator tool. The latter can produce cover designs suitable for paperback books (front, back and spine) and will import your existing e-book front cover if you wish (and it’s suitable). If you want a consistent look across both the e-book and print version of your book, however, you may face a few challenges.

You can set your own price for the paperback version of your book and receive 60% of the price paid once print costs have been deducted. This is obviously worth doing in order to reach the substantial audience of people who still prefer print books rather than electronic ones.

The KDP paperback creator is still in beta and additional features are promised in due course. One major thing lacking at the moment is any way of purchasing a sample print copy of your book so you can see for yourself what buyers will receive. This is clearly a drawback compared with CreateSpace. Neither do KDP published print books currently receive the extended distribution of CreateSpace titles.

If you currently publish on CreateSpace I can’t therefore see any compelling reason to switch to KDP at the moment. However, the likelihood is that once everything is working as it should KDP will become Amazon’s main hub for both e-book and print self-publishing. The future for CreateSpace after that is uncertain. For this reason if no other, it is a good idea to at least take a look at KDP’s paperback creator tool now.

I have made a start on converting one of my Kindle e-books using the KDP paperback creator, and will post here again once it is available. But I’d love to get your comments and feedback as well, especially if you have tried out the service yourself. Please leave any comments below as usual.

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AmaSuite 5: New Version of this Top Quality Amazon Research Product

AmaSuite 5: New Version of this Top Quality Amazon Research Tool

Regular readers will know that until recently I was chief bizopps reviewer for More Money Review.

By the end of my time working with MMR – and I am incidentally still on very good terms with them – I had reviewed several hundred home-business opportunities in a wide range of categories, from Kindle publishing courses to multi-level marketing schemes.

During this time I saw plenty of bad and ugly products, but not so many that were good. As a reviewer you soon get to know who the good developers are and who are the ones you need to avoid with the proverbial ten-foot barge-pole.

Anyway, Dave Guindon and his business partner Chris Guthrie are definitely in the ‘good’ category. They aren’t as prolific as some other developers, but when they do release a product it is almost always the best in its class. They routinely over-deliver to an astonishing degree. Their KD Suite of market research software for Kindle authors is something I have raved about in the past, for example.

Today, however, I wanted to draw your attention to another of their products, AmaSuite, which is just about to come out in its fifth iteration. This is a market research product (and training) for anyone interested in selling physical products on Amazon, either their own or as affiliates.

I reviewed an earlier version of AmaSuite (AmaSuite 3) for More Money Review a while ago. Here’s a link to my in-depth review there. Note that to read the whole review you will need to be a registered member and logged in, but registering is free and only takes a few moments. I have reproduced the conclusion to my review below…

Overall, I was highly impressed with AmaSuite 3. If you’re serious about making money as an Amazon affiliate, and willing to put some work in to make it happen, AmaSuite 3 will undoubtedly prove a valuable resource for you.

I was impressed with Dave Guindon’s earlier product KD Suite (also reviewed on More Money Review) and in my view AmaSuite 3 builds on the lessons he learned from that. It is a highly professional, multi-featured product that should provide you with all the tools and training you need to make a growing income as an Amazon affiliate.

The latest version of the software, AmaSuite 5, now has five main components, as opposed to the three in Amasuite 3 that I reviewed. Briefly, they are as follows:

Top Product Analyzer – This tool lists and analyzes the 100 best-selling products in the most popular 100 categories on both Amazon UK and Amazon.com.

Search Analyzer – This shows you the most popular products on Amazon for any given search phrase.

Keyword Analyzer – This extracts the exact keywords people are searching for right now by using four of the major online e-commerce websites in the world.

Review Analyzer – This tool helps you come up with ideas for white-label products you could create yourself, by analyzing reviews of existing products and highlighting feature requests and suggestions for improvement. You can then use this data to develop your own rival products that meet these requests and address the criticisms.

AliAnalyzer – This tool works with the popular AliExpress platform to discover best-selling products there and identify products you could dropship from your own e-commerce site.

I can’t really do justice to all the things these software tools can do for you in this post, so I highly recommend visiting the AmaSuite 5 offer page and reading the full in-depth descriptions there.

The software is by no means the end of it either. You also get two full-length training courses, one about making money as an Amazon affiliate, and the other about selling your own physical products on Amazon (which is where the really big money lies, of course).

And finally you get membership of their ‘AmaGroup’ on Facebook, where you can discuss how to make the most of AmaSuite with over 6000 other users.

As you will gather, I’m a big fan of AmaSuite. I appreciate it won’t be for everyone, but if Amazon selling or affiliate marketing is something that interests you, in my opinion buying Amasuite 5 is a no-brainer.

AmaSuite 5 Launch Discount Offer

I am pleased to say that Dave Guindon has kindly allowed me to offer a special launch discount to my blog readers. From now until the closing date of Friday 13 January you will be able to claim a huge $100 discount on the entire product if you order AmaSuite 5 via my link. After 13 January 2017 this offer will no longer be available, so please don’t delay if this product could be of value to you.

As ever, if you have any comments or questions about AmaSuite 5, please do post them below and I will do my best to answer them.

 

 

 

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Massive Royalties from Tiny Books

Review: Massive Royalties from Tiny Books

Massive Royalties from Tiny Books is a new product from Paul Coleman. It is being heavily promoted online at the moment, so I thought I would buy a copy myself to see if it is worthy of the hype.

Massive Royalties from Tiny Books is a guide to making money by publishing Kindle Short Reads. This is a category of short Kindle e-book recently created by Amazon. It should not be confused with Kindle Singles, for which you have to go through a submission process.

Anyone can write and publish a Kindle Short Read. The only stipulation is that the book should be under 100 pages. Paul tells us that this type of short e-book is becoming very popular among busy  people for whom time is at a premium.

So what do you get for your money? The main guide is a downloadable PDF manual. In keeping with the tiny books theme, it is quite short itself. There are just 23 pages, weighing in at around 6000 words. The content is organised in 12 sections, as follows:

1. Why Short Reads?
2. Bestsellers
3. Review Secrets
4. Book Description
5. Cover Magic
6. Hooks
7. Outline
8. Browse Categories
9. Launch and Promote
10. Bad Reaction
11. Good Reaction
12. Boxed Set

The advice is focused around creating fiction, and specifically romantic/erotic fiction aimed at women (like 50 Shades of Grey). It would have been nice to see some discussion about non-fiction as well.

On the plus side, Massive Royalties from Tiny Books makes a strong case for creating short Kindle e-books (Paul recommends aiming for just 30 pages or around 7500 words). And it does provide a step-by-step method for planning, writing and promoting a book of this type.

With only 23 pages the advice is clearly not in-depth, but you do get links to a good range of useful resources and information. For example, there are links to Kindle e-book research sites, the HTML codes you can use in your Amazon sales page descriptions, and to people offering to help promote your e-book inexpensively on Fiverr.

One thing you won’t find is any detailed advice on writing and publishing a Kindle e-book using the KDP (Kindle Direct Publishing) platform. I highly recommend Geoff Shaw’s Kindling for advice and training about this – and of course there is free information on formatting and publishing a Kindle e-book on the KDP help pages.

So is Massive Royalties from Tiny Books Worth Buying?

On balance, I think that Massive Royalties from Tiny Books is worth the $17 (around £14) currently being asked for it, especially as you also get access to a private Facebook group devoted to this subject.

Ideally it would be good if the manual covered a wider range of potential topics for short books. More discussion about the actual writing and publishing process might have helped those new to Kindle publishing as well. But it will undoubtedly open your eyes to the potential of this approach, and give you a practical step-by-step strategy which you can research further via other resources if required.

To sum up, if making money from Kindle publishing is something that interests you, this guide is definitely worth adding to your resources library.

If you have any comments or questions about Massive Royalties from Tiny Books, as always, please do post them below.

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My Guest Post About Making Money from Online Reviewing

Just a quickie today to let you know that I am currently guest posting on Emma Drew’s blog.

You might remember that I wrote about Emma earlier this year in my post How One Blogger Made £100,000 Working from Home on the Internet. Emma is a UK-based blogger who writes about a vast range of ways of making money online. I have been following her for a while now, and don’t mind admitting I have learned a lot by doing so.

My post on Emma’s blog is all about how to profit from reviewing things on the internet. It reveals various websites that will pay you for your reviews, and also looks at how you may be able to get all manner of free products as an Amazon Vine reviewer. I also discuss how you can make a steady income reviewing products and services on a blog of your own.

Anyway, I hope you will click through to my guest post How to Profit From Online Reviewing on Emma’s blog. As ever, if you have any comments or queries, please do post them below.

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Publisher's Power Tool

Review: Publisher’s Power Tool

Publisher’s Power Tool is the latest writing product to be launched by my colleague Amy Harrop and her business partner Debbie Drum. Amy and Debbie were kind enough to allow me a review copy, so here’s what I found…

Publisher’s Power Tool is a guide to publishing picture books for children and adults using the presentation software MIcrosoft PowerPoint (other software options are also discussed). The guide then reveals how to publish them as ebooks on Amazon’s Kindle platform and/or as print books using Amazon CreateSpace.

Publisher’s Power Tool is being sold via the popular and well-established WarriorPlus platform. The main guide is a 69-page PDF. As you would expect with any of Amy and Debbie’s publications, this is well written and attractively presented. It is illustrated with graphics and screen-captures where relevant.

The manual explains how you can capitalize on the huge market for picture books. Although children are the obvious target audience, the authors make the point that there is a sizeable market for adult picture books as well, including how-to books, humour books, and inspirational books.

The main part of the manual walks you through creating a picture book yourself with the aid of the PowerPoint software. It sets out the advantages of using PowerPoint for this purpose, including the ease with which you can create a template for publishing a series of such books. You can also easily insert pictures in bulk, which is a great time-saver. And it is also very easy to edit and rearrange the pages in a PowerPoint file, until you have your book looking exactly the way you want it.

The latter part of the manual then discusses how readers can publish and market the books themselves. Eight pages are devoted to Kindle publishing and ten pages to print publishing using CreateSpace. Clearly, covering how to do all this in detail would require a much longer book, so what Amy and Debbie have done is link to useful resources throughout the manual. Some of these are resources they have produced themselves, while others are from external websites. I understand that there may also be some extra reports and/or training videos with the finished product, although my pre-publication access only included the main manual.

The one thing that isn’t discussed in any depth is marketing your picture book (although the manual does discuss how to make the most of categories, keywords, and so on when listing your book on Amazon). Still, there is of course plenty of information about this available elsewhere on the internet, both free and paid for.

Overall, I think Publisher’s Power Tool is another excellent addition to the growing roster of writing resources published by Amy and Debbie. If you are already a confident PowerPoint user you may find some of the advice on using the software familiar, but it is still enlightening to see how the authors adapt it to this particular purpose.

Publisher’s Power Tool is currently on a launch special offer after which – as is Amy and Debbie’s usual practice – the price will be rising by $10. If you want to broaden your publishing portfolio with something that is fun and not too time-consuming, it is definitely worth checking out.

If you have any comments or questions about Publisher’s Power Tool, as always, please do post them below.

 

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Why Now is the Time to Start Promoting Your Amazon Affiliate Links Extra Hard

If you are reading this blog, it’s quite likely you have a book or e-book on Amazon. If that’s the case, you should be promoting it extra vigorously right now. And, specifically, you should be promoting it as an Amazon Associate (as Amazon calls its affiliates).

There are various reasons why promoting your book as an Amazon Associate is a good idea. The obvious one is that any sales generated through your link will attract commission from Amazon. Assuming you’re earning royalties on sales as well, in effect that means you’ll be getting paid twice over for every sale.

But there’s another particular reason to promote extra hard via Amazon just now, and that’s because you will receive commission from Amazon for ALL purchases made by a customer who visits the store via your link.

And in the coming weeks, in the run-up to Christmas, Diwali and Hanukkah, many people will be buying multiple items as gifts. If they do some or all of their gift shopping via your link, you will earn multiple commissions.

Admittedly, Amazon doesn’t pay a fortune to Associates. Commission starts at just 5 percent, rising to the dizzy heights of 15 percent for some products. By way of comparison, affiliate commissions paid on downloadable products are often over 50 percent, and in some cases up to 100.

Even so, if someone spends a lot of money on a visit (and it happens at this time of year) the returns to you as the referrer can be substantial. Darren Rowse (aka Problogger) regularly lists surprising products people have bought from Amazon on visits via his links. Here’s one eye-opening list he posted a while ago.

If you’re not an Amazon Associate already, you can easily join by scrolling down to the foot of the Amazon homepage, clicking on Associates Program, and following the instructions to sign up. Note that you will need to join each national store’s Associates Program separately to promote there.

Once you’re in, Amazon have a huge range of banners and widgets you can use on your blog or website. They include, of course, simple image ads such as the one below for my latest Kindle e-book on Amazon.com…

You can also have all manner of other widgets, including slideshows, word clouds, best deals boxes, and so on. Here’s an example of a seasonal banner that is automatically updated by Amazon.

Of course, it’s possible that all you want is a simple text link. Oddly enough, this isn’t as straightforward as you might think with Amazon. For text links Amazon give you about five lines of code which are designed to display your link in a pre-formatted, Amazon-approved style.

If you don’t want their complicated and largely superfluous formatting, here’s a simpler alternative. Use the following framework to construct your link:

—-http://www.amazon.com/dp/ASIN/?tag=yourAssociatesID—-

Or for Amazon UK use:

—http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/ASIN/?tag=yourAssociatesID—-

The ASIN is the unique identification number every product on Amazon has – you will find this in the product details. My own affiliate ID on Amazon UK is nickdawswriti-21, so a basic text link for my e-book above for the UK store would look like this: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00DP8HKLQ/?tag=nickdawswriti-21

One slight drawback of this method is that if your visitor is located somewhere with a different national Amazon store, they won’t automatically be redirected. If you are targeting a multinational audience (very likely online) you might therefore like to use the free Geniuslink or Booklinker service.

Both of these are run by the GeoRiot organization. They create a single link that detects where visitors live and automatically forwards them to their own national store, with your affiliate link included if you have entered it for the store concerned.

I wrote about Geniuslink in this recent post, and Booklinker in this one. Geniuslink has a few more bells and whistles than Booklinker, but once your links are generating over 1,000 clicks a month you start paying for the service. Booklinker is a more stripped-down service, but it is free however many clicks your links attract.

Here is a sample link created with Booklinker for my Kindle e-book on plotting: http://mybook.to/ThreeGreat. Click on this and it should take you straight to the appropriate page of your own national Amazon store. Do try it and see 🙂

Good luck on Amazon, and I hope you sell lots of book, e-books and more expensive items as the festive season approaches!

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Permafree Publishing Quickstart by Amy Harrop

Review: Permafree Publishing Quickstart

Permafree Publishing Quickstart is the latest writing guide to be launched by the prolific Amy Harrop.

Amy is a successful Kindle author, and publisher of many guides and software products for authors. She was kind enough to allow me a review copy, so here’s what I found…

Permafree Publishing Quickstart is a guide to making money by publishing content that, as the name implies, is permanently free. The main guide is a 22-page downloadable PDF.

As you would expect with any of Amy’s guides, this is well written and attractively presented. It is illustrated with screen captures where appropriate.

Although you can obviously publish free content in a huge range of places, the manual focuses especially on publishing to Amazon. Specifically, it reveals a method for publishing free e-books on Amazon, even though using Kindle Direct Publishing the lowest price you can normally set is 99p/99c.

You might ask what is the benefit of publishing a free e-book. Amy reveals that this can be a great way of boosting your readership, building a mailing list, getting traffic to your blog or website, and so on. Amazon is, of course, the world’s biggest online store, and offers the potential for reaching a huge worldwide readership.

In Permafree Publishing Quickstart Amy emphasises that to benefit from permafree, you need to have a clear strategy, otherwise you will simply be wasting time and money. She reveals various ways you can turn permafree publishing to profit. The latter part of the manual also examines how you can make money directly from your permafree content by selling it via other platforms, e.g. as audiobooks.

In addition to the main manual, there are a number of bonuses. One is a step-by-step guide to using the Aweber autoresponder service. If you plan to use your permafree content to help build a list, membership of such a service is pretty much essential. I am a fan of Aweber myself and do recommend their service, incidentally.

Other bonuses include landing page and opt-in templates, which you can edit and adapt to your own purposes. Again, if you plan on using your permafree content to help build a list, these could be valuable resources.

Overall, I thought Permafree Publishing Quickstart was another high-quality product from Amy Harrop. Permafree publishing is undoubtedly a powerful technique when used correctly, and the advice in this guide (based on Amy’s own experience) will undoubtedly point you in the right direction. It is currently available at a launch offer price of $17, after which it will be rising to $27. There is an unconditional 30-day guarantee.

If you have any comments or questions about Permafree Publishing Quickstart, as ever, please feel free to post them below.

Buy Permafree Publishing Quickstart
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Kindle Instant Previews

Let Readers Preview Your Kindle Book on Your Website

Amazon have just introduced a new feature for Kindle authors named Kindle instant previews. It allows you to post a preview of your Kindle ebook on your blog or website.

Here is an example with my Kindle ebook about plotting…

And here’s another example with my sci-fi novella The Festival on Lyris Five

You can read step-by-step instructions for using Kindle instant previews on this page of the Amazon.com website. Basically, you have to navigate to your ebook’s sales page on Amazon.com (not Amazon UK), click on the “Embed” link next to the other sharing options, and then either copy the special link provided or embed the HTML (which is what I have done above).

A plus point is that once you have clicked on the “Embed” link, you have the option to include your Amazon Associates (affiliate) code if you wish. One think you can’t do, however, is use a geo-targeted link such as those provided by Geni.us (formerly GeoRiot) or BookLinker.

Kindle instant previews are undoubtedly a great feature to promote your Kindle ebooks, however – and you could also use them to promote other authors’ ebooks as an affiliate.

If you have any comments or questions about Kindle instant previews, as ever, please do post them below. Feel free also to post links to your own blog posts using Kindle instant previews if you like.

  • If you are new to writing Kindle ebooks, or looking to make the most of this massive potential market for your work, I highly recommend Geoff Shaw’s Kindling, still the most comprehensive guide to writing both fiction and nonfiction for Kindle. Click through here for my full blog review.
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Amazon logo

Why Now is the Time to Start Promoting Your Amazon Associate Links Extra Hard!

If you’re reading this blog, it’s quite likely you have a book or e-book on Amazon. If that’s the case, you should be promoting it extra vigorously right now. And, specifically, you should be promoting it as an Amazon Associate (as Amazon calls its affiliates).

There are various reasons why promoting your book as an Amazon Associate is a good idea. The obvious one is that any sales generated through your link will attract commission from Amazon. Assuming you’re earning royalties on sales as well, in effect that means you’ll be getting paid twice over for every sale.

But there’s another particular reason to promote extra hard via Amazon just now, and that’s because you will receive commission from Amazon for ALL purchases made by a customer who visits the store via your link.

And in the coming weeks, in the run-up to Christmas, Diwali and Hanukkah, many people will be buying multiple items as gifts. If they do some or all of their gift shopping via your link, you will earn multiple commissions.

Admittedly, Amazon doesn’t pay a fortune to Associates. Commission starts at just 5 percent, rising to the dizzy heights of 15 percent for some products. By way of comparison, the affiliate program run by my publishers The Self Development Network pays up to 70 percent on sales.

Even so, if someone spends a lot of money on a visit (and it happens at this time of year) the returns to you as the referrer can be substantial. Darren Rowse (aka Problogger) regularly lists surprising products people have bought from Amazon on visits via his links. Here’s one eye-opening list he posted a while ago.

If you’re not an Amazon Associate already, you can easily join by scrolling down to the foot of the Amazon homepage, clicking on Associates Program, and following the instructions to sign up. Note that you will need to join each national store’s Associates Program separately to promote there.

Once you’re in, Amazon have a huge range of banners and widgets you can use on your blog or website. They include, of course, simple image ads such as the one below for my latest Kindle e-book on Amazon.com…

You can also have all manner of other widgets, including slideshows, word clouds, best deals boxes, and so on. Here’s an example of a rotating banner widget for Kindle ebooks and accessories. If you refresh the page, a different banner will be displayed…

Note that if you are receiving this post by email or RSS, you may need to visit my blog to see the sample ad and widget.

Of course, it’s possible that all you want is a simple text link. Oddly enough, this isn’t as straightforward as you might think with Amazon. For text links Amazon give you about five lines of code which are designed to display your link in a pre-formatted, Amazon-approved style.

If you don’t want their complicated and largely superfluous formatting, here’s a simpler alternative. Use the following framework to construct your link:

—-http://www.amazon.com/dp/ASIN/?tag=yourAssociatesID—-

Or for Amazon UK use:

—http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/ASIN/?tag=yourAssociatesID—-

The ASIN is the unique identification number every product on Amazon has – you will find this in the product details. My own affiliate ID on Amazon UK is nickdawswriti-21, so a basic text link for my e-book above for the UK store would look like this: http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B00DP8HKLQ/?tag=nickdawswriti-21

One slight drawback of this method is that if your visitor is located somewhere with a different national Amazon store, they won’t automatically be redirected. If you are targeting a multinational audience (very likely online) you might therefore like to use the free Geniuslink or Booklinker service.

Both of these are run by the GeoRiot organization. They create a single link that detects where visitors live and automatically forwards them to their own national store, with your affiliate link included if you have entered it for the store concerned.

I wrote about Geniuslink in this recent post, and Booklinker in this one. Geniuslink has a few more bells and whistles than Booklinker, but once your links are generating over 1,000 clicks a month you start paying for the service. Booklinker is a more stripped-down service, but it is free however many clicks your links attract.

Here is a sample link created with Booklinker for my Kindle e-book on plotting: http://mybook.to/ThreeGreat. Click on this and it should take you straight to the appropriate page of your own national Amazon store. Do try it and see 🙂

Good luck on Amazon, and I hope you sell lots of book, e-books and more expensive items as the festive season approaches!

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The GeoRiot Link Management Platform Is Now Geniuslink

Regular readers will know that I’m a big fan of the GeoRiot link management platform. This lets you convert any Amazon link into a universal link that detects where a visitor is from and forwards them to their own national Amazon store – optionally with your affiliate link included. GeoRiot also works with the iTunes store, incidentally.

I was recently informed by GeoRiot that they are rebranding as Geniuslink. On their blog they explain this as follows:

The shift to Geniuslink, from GeoRiot, is a refocus on the what our service has become, and the foundation we’ve built for making it even better.    

How we got here

  • It started last May when we acquired the “geni.us” domain.  

  • In July of 2014 we launched advanced targets: the ability to fully customize the behavior of your link by easily adding custom rules based on any combination of country, device, OS, and date of click.  These were the first footsteps out of the iTunes and Amazon affiliate link space where we had been laser focused since 2009.  

  • The next major steps came in late 2014 with our beta launch of integrated tracking and retargeting pixels, allowing you to target your audience to remarket to them for future promotions.  

  • Early spring of 2015 saw the pixeling going live along with opening our geni.us links, allowing for infinite combinations of advanced targeting and pixels so our clients could create the perfect link for every promotion.  

  • Today’s launch takes the focus off of our company name and puts it squarely on our flagship service, the incredibly powerful and super intelligent geni.us links, a marketer’s best friend.  

Source: http://blog.geni.us/2015/08/25/georiot-goes-geniuslink/

So instead of visiting the old GeoRiot service to sign up for this service or manage your account, you now need to visit http://www.geni.us.

Incidentally, this change does not affect BookLinker, the other link management platform run by the company, which I wrote about in this blog post. The difference between the two services is that Geniuslink (previously GeoRiot) offers more stats and options for users, but once clicks through your links exceed 1000 a month you are charged a small fee. BookLinker offers a more basic service, but it is free no matter how many people click on your links.

For more information about these services and why I recommend them, please read this blog post about GeoRiot and this one about BookLinker. Or click through to the Geniuslink or BookLinker websites, of course.

Note that I do not receive any financial compensation for recommending these services. I simply think they are very useful resources, and I am therefore very happy to share them with my readers.

As ever, if you have any queries about this update, please do post them below.

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