amy harrop

Easy PD Profits

Review: Easy PD Profits by Amy Harrop

Easy PD Profits is the latest product launch by the ever-prolific Amy Harrop.

Amy is a successful self-published author, and publisher of many guides and software products for authors. She was kind enough to allow me pre-launch review access, so here’s what I found…

Easy PD Profits is about making money with the aid of public domain content. As you probably know, this is content available to edit, adapt and publish as you wish without any need to pay or credit the original creator. It comes typically from old sources that are now out of copyright (though some government-produced content also falls into this category). As well as books and articles, it includes photos, drawings, illustrations, films, and more.

Easy PD Profits has two main elements, a manual and a software tool.

The manual is a 71-page PDF. As you would expect with any of Amy’s publications, this is well written and attractively presented. It is illustrated with graphics and screen captures where relevant.

In the manual, Amy describes a range of ways you can make money from public domain content. It is organized into five blueprints:

#1-Create a Website Using PD Material
#2 Sell Image-Based Content Collections
#3 Publish Books with Public Domain Content
#4-Tap into the Hot Vintage Marketplace
#5 Sell Image-Based Physical Products

Each of these methods is described in detail with real-life examples. Any could easily become the basis for a highly profitable business on its own.

In general, the emphasis is on using the PD content as a starting point, creating books and websites combining it with original content, or selling physical products such as posters, mugs and tee-shirts that incorporate it. This approach seems eminently sensible to me, as of course you can’t claim copyright over PD content and others are free to use it as well.

As well as the manual, you get Amy’s Public Domain Dashboard software (see screen capture below). This is a simple program that will run on any Windows PC. You don’t have to install it, just save it anywhere convenient on your PC (e.g. the desktop) and double-click to launch it.

Public Domain Dashboard software

You can also use the software on a Mac, using Parallels or Wine. Video training on how to set up the software with Wine is included.

One important thing to note is that this is NOT a search engine for PD content. Rather, it is a spreadsheet-style database of sources. It is actually a collection of spreadsheets, listing sources of public domain photos, illustrations, books and other written content, and so forth. A short excerpt from the Books and Written Content list is shown below.

Public Domain Dashboard excerpt

The software is very easy and intuitive to use (help videos are provided but I doubt if most people will need them). It works online so you will need a live internet connection to use it. I guess that might be a problem for a few folk, but if you have a standard broadband connection it won’t be an issue. And it does have the big advantage that you can click on any link to open the web page in question (they open immediately in a new Internet Explorer window).

Even better, Amy promises to update the information regularly incorporating user feedback and suggestions, so the software will constantly grow in value. You may notice that there is a Suggest a Site button which you can use in a public-spirited way to upload any useful resources you discover yourself.

Other bonuses on offer with Easy PD Profits include guides to setting up an Etsy Store and how to profit from Shopify (see screen capture from the sales page below). I didn’t receive these with my preview copy, but they both look relevant and useful. As Amy says, public domain content can be a perfect starting place for creating physical products you can sell via these platforms.

In summary, Easy PD Profits is another high-quality product from Amy Harrop. It sets out an array of methods you can use to make money from public domain content.

It is currently on sale at a launch offer price of $27 (about £22), after which – as is Amy’s usual practice – the price will be rising by $10 to $37. If you are an entrepreneurial writer looking to add more income streams to your portfolio, it is definitely worth checking out.

If you have any comments or questions about Easy PD Profits, as always, please do post them below.

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Publisher's Power Tool

Review: Publisher’s Power Tool

Publisher’s Power Tool is the latest writing product to be launched by my colleague Amy Harrop and her business partner Debbie Drum. Amy and Debbie were kind enough to allow me a review copy, so here’s what I found…

Publisher’s Power Tool is a guide to publishing picture books for children and adults using the presentation software MIcrosoft PowerPoint (other software options are also discussed). The guide then reveals how to publish them as ebooks on Amazon’s Kindle platform and/or as print books using Amazon CreateSpace.

Publisher’s Power Tool is being sold via the popular and well-established WarriorPlus platform. The main guide is a 69-page PDF. As you would expect with any of Amy and Debbie’s publications, this is well written and attractively presented. It is illustrated with graphics and screen-captures where relevant.

The manual explains how you can capitalize on the huge market for picture books. Although children are the obvious target audience, the authors make the point that there is a sizeable market for adult picture books as well, including how-to books, humour books, and inspirational books.

The main part of the manual walks you through creating a picture book yourself with the aid of the PowerPoint software. It sets out the advantages of using PowerPoint for this purpose, including the ease with which you can create a template for publishing a series of such books. You can also easily insert pictures in bulk, which is a great time-saver. And it is also very easy to edit and rearrange the pages in a PowerPoint file, until you have your book looking exactly the way you want it.

The latter part of the manual then discusses how readers can publish and market the books themselves. Eight pages are devoted to Kindle publishing and ten pages to print publishing using CreateSpace. Clearly, covering how to do all this in detail would require a much longer book, so what Amy and Debbie have done is link to useful resources throughout the manual. Some of these are resources they have produced themselves, while others are from external websites. I understand that there may also be some extra reports and/or training videos with the finished product, although my pre-publication access only included the main manual.

The one thing that isn’t discussed in any depth is marketing your picture book (although the manual does discuss how to make the most of categories, keywords, and so on when listing your book on Amazon). Still, there is of course plenty of information about this available elsewhere on the internet, both free and paid for.

Overall, I think Publisher’s Power Tool is another excellent addition to the growing roster of writing resources published by Amy and Debbie. If you are already a confident PowerPoint user you may find some of the advice on using the software familiar, but it is still enlightening to see how the authors adapt it to this particular purpose.

Publisher’s Power Tool is currently on a launch special offer after which – as is Amy and Debbie’s usual practice – the price will be rising by $10. If you want to broaden your publishing portfolio with something that is fun and not too time-consuming, it is definitely worth checking out.

If you have any comments or questions about Publisher’s Power Tool, as always, please do post them below.

 

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Puzzle Publishing Profits

Review: Puzzle Publishing Profits by Amy Harrop

Puzzle Publishing Profits is the latest writing product to be launched by my prolific colleague Amy Harrop.

Amy is a successful self-published author, and publisher of many guides and software products for authors. She was kind enough to allow me a review copy, so here’s what I found…

Puzzle Publishing Profits is a guide to making money by publishing puzzle books of all types, probably using Amazon’s CreateSpace print publishing platform. It is being sold via the popular and well-established WarriorPlus platform. The main guide is a 60-page PDF.

As you would expect with any of Amy’s publications, this is well written and attractively presented. It is illustrated with graphics and screen captures where relevant.

In the manual, Amy explains how you can capitalize on the huge market for puzzle books. She starts by discussing the wide range of such books and reveals the various target audiences for them, from children to the elderly. She also discusses current trends in the puzzle books field. The manual covers crossword puzzles, Sudoku, logic puzzles, maze puzzles, word-search, graphic puzzles, math (or maths) puzzles, brainteasers, and many more.

The latter part of the manual then discusses how readers can write, publish and market these books themselves. Amy recommends publishing in print rather than Kindle e-book form, as in general people like to complete puzzles using a pen and paper, not on a tablet or e-reader. As mentioned above, she recommends using Amazon’s CreateSpace POD (print on demand) self-publishing platform.

Clearly covering how to do all this in detail would require a much longer book, so what Amy has done is link to useful resources throughout the manual. Some of these resources she has produced herself, while others are from external websites. An example of the former is a six-page spreadsheet listing sources of online puzzle-making software (free and paid for), puzzle-making resources, forums, Facebook Groups, Yahoo Groups, and Pinterest pages. The forum, groups and Pinterest pages strike me as being more relevant for puzzle aficionados than for puzzle-book makers,. but the software and resources websites are certainly worth knowing about.

There is some good advice on publishing your puzzle book using CreateSpace, again with links to other resources for finding out more. The manual closes with an 8-page discussion of how to promote your puzzle book. This focuses especially on writing a good description of your book for the Amazon store, and using social media to build your following and help spread the word. I thought there were some very good tips here.

When preparing puzzle books, Amy advises strongly against referring to actual product and brand names. While I understand her caution, personally I think it’s a bit excessive. While I would agree that producing a Frozen puzzle book is a bad idea and would likely attract the attention of the Disney company lawyers, simply mentioning the name of a movie or TV show in a broader-based book is unlikely to cause problems. If that were not the case, most trivia quiz books (such as the one pictured below that I wrote a while ago for my clients at Lagoon Games) would never see the light of day. The key thing is to be sensible and only refer to high-profile, trademarked productions in a broader context. In a themed puzzle book about movies, for example, you could (in my view) have a wordsearch puzzle featuring the names of well-known characters from children’s films.

TV trivia quiz book by Nick Daws

As well as the main manual, buyers of Puzzle Publishing Profits get two bonus items. I didn’t actually receive these with my pre-launch review copy, but here are the descriptions from the sales page:

Amy Puzzle Book Bonusese

It sounds as though these will add value to the main manual, especially the CreateSpace publishing guide.

In summary, Puzzle Publishing Profits is an eye-opening guide to a field that appears crammed with potential right now, and it has definitely inspired me to think about trying it myself. It is currently on a launch special offer for $17 (about £14), after which – as is Amy’s usual practice – the price will be rising to $27. If you want to broaden your publishing portfolio with something that is fun and not too time-consuming, it is definitely worth a look.

If you have any comments or questions about Puzzle Publishing Profits, as always, please do post them below.

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Pop Culture Publishing Profits

Review: Pop Culture Publishing Profits

Pop Culture Publishing Profits is the latest writing guide to be launched by the prolific Amy Harrop.

Amy is a successful Kindle author, and publisher of many guides and software products for authors. She was kind enough to allow me a review copy, so here’s what I found…

Pop Culture Publishing Profits is a guide to making money by publishing e-books (or books) that leverage the popularity of high-profile movies, TV shows, video games, and so on. The main guide is a 41-page PDF.

As you would expect with any of Amy’s publications, this is well written and attractively presented. It is illustrated with screen captures (mainly of Amazon reviews) where relevant.

In the manual, Amy explains how you can capitalize on the huge interest in popular culture. She reveals how you can create books and e-books that will appeal to people interested in the shows and products concerned. One example she gives is a Kindle e-book on the subject of The Vikings, which appeared to have been written to cash in on the popularity of the TV show of the same name.

The big advantage of writing and publishing books related to popular culture is that there is a large group of people interested in these matters, who in many cases are actively seeking more information about them. If you can publish a book that comes up high in the results when they are searching (either online or on Amazon), you could potentially generate a lot of sales.

Amy discusses a variety of niches in which this could work. As well as the movies, TV shows and video games mentioned above, she includes politics, sport, music and books. Unfortunately (from an author’s perspective!) the latter is not as big a niche as the others mentioned, but it is certainly possible to write books/e-books that capitalize on the popularity of current or forthcoming titles.

Speaking of which, one thing that impressed me about Pop Culture Publishing Profits was how Amy reveals ways to find out about forthcoming productions likely to have lots of people talking about them. Certainly, if you can write a book that ties in with the next blockbusting movie (for example), you could be on the way to generating large numbers of sales.

Although the guide is fairly concise, it includes links to other resources – some by Amy, some by other people – covering specific issues and questions. There is a link to some additional training by Amy herself on how to get reviews for your books, for example.

The manual also covers the tricky subject of avoiding copyright and trademark infringement. Amy advises writers to use public domain content as much as possible, e.g. if a forthcoming movie is based on an old fairytale which is out of copyright, you could publish your own version of the tale by adapting a public domain version. Note that Amazon won’t allow you to simply republish public domain content, so you will need to rewrite/adapt it in some way to make it original.

As well as the main guide, there are various bonuses. These include a publishing guide, writing outlines for a variety of books, and a research and writing guide to help you publish quickly.

In summary, Pop Culture Publishing Profits contains some eye-opening ideas and information, and has definitely inspired me to think about trying this approach myself. It is currently on a launch special offer, after which the price will be rising to $27. If you are interested in this opportunity, it is well worth a look. It doesn’t go into the actual mechanics of publishing a book or e-book, but there is plenty of good advice about this available elsewhere (Geoff Shaw’s Kindling, my number one recommended resource for Kindle e-book authors, for example).

If you have any comments or questions about Pop Culture Publishing Profits, as always, please do post them below.

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3 Minute Journals Review

3 Minute Journals is the latest writing product to be launched by the prolific Amy Harrop, in association with her regular collaborator Debbie Drum.

Amy is a successful author, and the publisher of many guides and software products for authors. She was kind enough to allow me a review copy, so here’s what I found…

3 Minute Journals is a software tool and training course for creating print journals for publication on CreateSpace and other print-on-demand services. For those (like me) whom this trend has largely passed by, journals are print books where most of the content is supplied by the purchaser. They take a variety of forms, including diet journals, prayer journals, dream journals, and of course writer’s journals!

Journals and other types of interactive print books are very popular right now, and this product is designed to help you publish your own. Essentially, all you have to do to create one is add some artwork and page borders and perhaps a few inspirational quotations. Once your journal is published it can be a source of ongoing royalty income, potentially for many years to come.

Like many of Amy’s products, 3 Minute Journals is accessed via a password-protected WordPress site (so don’t lose your log-in details). This has the advantage that that you can access it from any computer with an internet connection, and it can also be easily updated and expanded.

The members area is divided into six main sections, each of which contains training videos, PDF guides, and so on. You can also download the 3 Minute Journals software from the “Creating Your Journal” page. The full list of sections is as follows:

  1. Welcome
  2. Why Journals
  3. Creating Your Journal
  4. Formatting Your Journal
  5. Publishing Your Journal
  6. Getting Exposure for Your Journal

As you will gather, the training takes you from a discussion of journals and why they are an attractive outlet for self-publishers, through creating your own (using the 3 Minute Journals software in conjunction with Word or similar), to publishing via Amazon’s CreateSpace platform, and then to publicizing and promoting your journal/s. The training is largely video-based, although there is some written content and there are also PDFs you can download.

The 3 Minute Journals software runs on Java, and it is important that you have the latest version installed on your computer. It turned out that I didn’t, so the software didn’t initially work for me. Once I had updated my version, however – which is straightforward enough – everything worked without a hitch.

One other thing to note is that the software doesn’t actually install to your PC. You simply double-click to run it. This makes it straightforward to use and (I believe) reduces the system demand on your computer. You do need to save it somewhere sensible on your PC, though. The desktop would be a good choice for many people.

The software is essentially a structuring tool for your journals. It lets you decide how many pages your journal will have, the page size, chapter headings, number of pages per chapter, number of ’empty’ pages, and so on. You could do all this in Microsoft Word, of course, but the software makes it quick and easy to create a basic journal structure, which you can then export to Word to add images, page borders, and any other bells and whistles. Here is a screen capture of the software with a sample project in progress.

3MJsoftware

The training covers pretty much everything you need to know to use the software and publish your journal on CreateSpace. One thing I did notice, though, is that some of the resources refer to other types of product than journals, including ordinary books. I assume these have been borrowed from other training courses that Amy and Debbie have created. It’s not really a problem, although ideally it would be nice if all the resources were solely about journal creation and created specifically for this product. On the other hand, if you plan to publish other types of print book as well, I guess you would find this useful.

Overall, I thought 3 Minute Journals was a high-quality guide to creating and publishing a type of print book that has good long-term selling potential. Inevitably there will be a learning curve, especially if you have never published on CreateSpace before. Once you are up to speed, however, there is no reason you couldn’t publish a range of journals very quickly. It is definitely an opportunity any entrepreneurial writer should consider.

Finally, I should note that 3 Minute Journals is on sale at a launch offer price of $27 until 24 June 2016, after which the cost will almost double.

As always, if you have any comments or queries about 3 Minute Journals, please do post them below.

 

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Permafree Publishing Quickstart by Amy Harrop

Review: Permafree Publishing Quickstart

Permafree Publishing Quickstart is the latest writing guide to be launched by the prolific Amy Harrop.

Amy is a successful Kindle author, and publisher of many guides and software products for authors. She was kind enough to allow me a review copy, so here’s what I found…

Permafree Publishing Quickstart is a guide to making money by publishing content that, as the name implies, is permanently free. The main guide is a 22-page downloadable PDF.

As you would expect with any of Amy’s guides, this is well written and attractively presented. It is illustrated with screen captures where appropriate.

Although you can obviously publish free content in a huge range of places, the manual focuses especially on publishing to Amazon. Specifically, it reveals a method for publishing free e-books on Amazon, even though using Kindle Direct Publishing the lowest price you can normally set is 99p/99c.

You might ask what is the benefit of publishing a free e-book. Amy reveals that this can be a great way of boosting your readership, building a mailing list, getting traffic to your blog or website, and so on. Amazon is, of course, the world’s biggest online store, and offers the potential for reaching a huge worldwide readership.

In Permafree Publishing Quickstart Amy emphasises that to benefit from permafree, you need to have a clear strategy, otherwise you will simply be wasting time and money. She reveals various ways you can turn permafree publishing to profit. The latter part of the manual also examines how you can make money directly from your permafree content by selling it via other platforms, e.g. as audiobooks.

In addition to the main manual, there are a number of bonuses. One is a step-by-step guide to using the Aweber autoresponder service. If you plan to use your permafree content to help build a list, membership of such a service is pretty much essential. I am a fan of Aweber myself and do recommend their service, incidentally.

Other bonuses include landing page and opt-in templates, which you can edit and adapt to your own purposes. Again, if you plan on using your permafree content to help build a list, these could be valuable resources.

Overall, I thought Permafree Publishing Quickstart was another high-quality product from Amy Harrop. Permafree publishing is undoubtedly a powerful technique when used correctly, and the advice in this guide (based on Amy’s own experience) will undoubtedly point you in the right direction. It is currently available at a launch offer price of $17, after which it will be rising to $27. There is an unconditional 30-day guarantee.

If you have any comments or questions about Permafree Publishing Quickstart, as ever, please feel free to post them below.

Buy Permafree Publishing Quickstart
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Passive Publishing System Relaunch

In this post last year I talked about Passive Publishing System, a new course and software product from my colleague Amy Harrop.

Passive Publishing System reveals how authors can cash in on two alternative publishing platforms to Kindle, the iBookstore and Scribd. It is a combination software tool and training course that aims to identify popular niches with high interest and low competition on these platforms.

  • iBookstore – The iBookstore is now the #2 digital publishing platform (behind Kindle) but it has about 1/10th of the competition (depending on the niche/category). Amy claims it is easy to make sales on this platform, with no marketing needed.
  • Scribd – Scribd is now a subscription platform similar to Kindle Unlimited and Oyster. Amy says that publishers who place their books on this platform (you can’t do it directly for their subscription program, but Amy shows you how in the training) make easy sales, again with no marketing needed.
The included PPS software does keyword, niche, and competition analysis specifically for these two platforms. The product also includes training on how to publish to both, as many people have no idea how to get their content into these marketplaces.
 
Amy recently relaunched Passive Publishing System, and for the next few days it is available at a $10 discount on the normal price of $37.

I have just reviewed Passive Publishing System for my clients at More Money Review. You can read my full review on this page of the MMR website if you wish. You will need to be registered with the site and logged in to see the full review, but this is free and only takes a moment.

Overall, though, I thought this was a pretty good product. The manual makes a good case for publishing on these two platforms, in particular because there is a lot less competition than on Kindle. I thought there could have been a bit more detail on the practical aspects of publishing, but the general advice is certainly sound.

The software doesn’t have too many bells and whistles, but it does an excellent job of searching Scribd and the iBookstore for your chosen keywords and showing how much competition there is for them. It should be a valuable tool for identifying potentially profitable niches on these two platforms. You can see a demo of how the software works in the video below.

It is worth noting that if you don’t have a Mac, publishing on the iBookstore will be more challenging. Amy suggests two alternatives, one of which is using an aggregating service that will publish your work to various platforms simultaneously (and no, it’s not Smashwords). I will definitely be looking into this further myself.

Passive Publishing System will probably be of most interest to writers who already have some experience publishing to Kindle, who are now looking to add additional (or alternative) income streams. In my view it is well worth a look.

If you have any comments or questions about Passive Publishing System, as ever, please feel free to post them below.

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Taming the Dragon

Taming the Dragon Review

Taming the Dragon is the latest product for writers to be released by the prolific Amy Harrop.

Taming the Dragon is a guide for content writers on how they can boost their productivity when creating articles, ebooks, blog posts, and so on. It’s just been launched at a low offer price of $18 (about 12 UKP), and will be available at this price for a limited time only.

Amy was kind enough to allow me pre-launch reviewer access to Taming the Dragon, so here’s what I found…

Like many of Amy’s products, Taming the Dragon is accessed via a password-protected WordPress site (so don’t lose your log-in details!). This has the advantage that that you can access it from any computer with an internet connection, and it can also be easily updated and expanded.

The main course content for Taming the Dragon takes the form of a 62-page PDF. This includes plenty of links to additional resources. Some of these are provided by Amy herself, but most are on external websites.

As you might expect from this experienced author, the PDF is well written and presented. The table of contents at the front has active links, a feature which is always much appreciated. The text is interspersed with graphics and screen-capture illustrations where appropriate.

I hope I’m not giving away too much by revealing that Taming the Dragon is all about boosting your productivity by using speech recognition (SR) software. The Dragon in the title is actually Dragon Naturally Speaking. This is the market-leading SR program, and the one that Amy recommends herself.

The manual discusses how to make the most of SR software, whether for creating fiction or nonfiction, and also for editing and general email and computer tasks. Amy is clearly a big fan of SR, and she reveals various tips and techniques she has used personally to make herself so productive. The main emphasis is on using Dragon Naturally Speaking, but other SR tools (including some free ones) are also discussed.

In addition to the main manual, there are modules devoted specifically to fiction writing and nonfiction writing. These include training videos and other resources.

There is also a module on using “content accelerators”. These are basically brief outlines of articles you could write on a wide range of subjects, from dating to weight loss, affiliate marketing to juicing. The content accelerators are available to download separately in compressed Zip files, with the content in both Word and Mac OS X formats.

Finally, there is a downloadable 32-page PDF guide to content research for online content creators. This sets out a range of online research tools and techniques you can use, including keyword research, Google Trends, spying on your competitors, Evernote, and so forth.

Overall, I thought Taming the Dragon was another high-quality product from Amy Harrop. It will give you insights into how you can use speech recognition software to greatly boost your productivity, and the “content accelerators” may be useful if you need ideas/outlines for content you could produce in double-quick time. If you run a dating website, for example, there are some good ideas for articles about dating you could produce quickly (using speech recognition software, of course!).

As ever, if you have any comments or queries about Taming the Dragon, please do post them below.

UPDATE: Just heard that the price of Taming the Dragon will be going up on Monday 25 January. Order now to get it at the launch offer price!

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Piggyback Publishing Profits

Review: Piggyback Publishing Profits by Amy Harrop

Piggyback Publishing Profits is the latest writing guide to be launched by the prolific Amy Harrop.

Amy is a successful Kindle author, and publisher of many guides and software products for authors. She was kind enough to allow me a review copy, so here’s what I found…

Piggyback Publishing Profits is a guide to making money by publishing e-books (or books) that, as the name indicates, piggyback on the success of popular books and movies. The main guide is a 47-page PDF.

As you would expect with any of Amy’s guides, this is well written and attractively presented. It is illustrated with screen captures (mainly of Amazon reviews) where relevant.

In the manual, Amy explains how you can make money by writing “piggyback” titles in various categories. These include study guides (like Cliff Notes), but also books aimed at book clubs, fans, businesspeople, self-help readers, and so on. In all cases, the aim is to create a short e-book (15 to 50 pages) that summarizes what is in the main title, and perhaps provides a commentary on it as well.

As Amy explains, this sort of title can appeal to busy people who want a quick way of getting to grips with the content of a book without having to read it cover to cover. But they also work as aides-memoire for those who have actually read the book, effectively sparing them the task of writing detailed notes on it themselves. And, of course, they can appeal to fans of the book (or movie) in question, who want some additional insights into it.

One big advantage of writing and publishing books like these is that there is a large potential readership, and they will also appear high in the search results for the title in question. Done well, then, such books could potentially be very lucrative.

Amy does a good job of explaining the different options, with examples included. She provides outline templates for various types of piggyback book, including business, self-help, diet, religion and spirituality, fiction, study guides, and fan books. Advice is also provided about optimizing your e-book’s title and description, so that it appears high in Amazon’s search results.

Piggyback Publishing Profits also sets out some great tips on other ways of promoting your titles. Many of these would apply equally to other types of Kindle e-book, incidentally.

The manual also covers the tricky subject of avoiding copyright infringement. The advice Amy gives is sensible enough, though she admits she is not a lawyer and her advice is based mainly on custom and practice. She emphasizes the importance of putting a disclaimer in your book to the effect that it is unofficial/unauthorized, and recommends checking out similar books to see the wording they use. I did feel it would have been helpful if she had included some sample disclaimers herself, though.

As well as the main guide, buyers receive three additional PDF manuals as bonuses. These are Pinterest for Businesses, Marketing with Infographics and Marketing with Slideshows. These are all quite substantial guides, with a minimum of 20 pages. I found them useful and interesting.

Piggyback Publishing Profits is currently on a launch special offer, after which the price will be rising by $10. If you are interested in this opportunity, it is definitely well worth a look. It doesn’t, of course, go into the actual mechanics of publishing an e-book on Kindle, but there is plenty of good advice about this available elsewhere (Geoff Shaw’s Kindling, my number one recommended resource, for example).

If you have any comments or questions about Piggyback Publishing Profits, as always, feel free to post them below.

Piggyback Publishing Profits

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Passive Publishing System

New Launch: Passive Publishing System

Regular readers will know that I am a big fan of Amy Harrop, a successful Kindle author and publisher of many guides and software products for authors.

I thought you might therefore like to know that her latest product, Passive Publishing System, has just gone live. Written with Rob Howard and Deb Drum, it reveals how authors can cash in on two alternative publishing platforms to Kindle, the iBookstore and Scribd. PPS is a combination software tool and training course that finds popular niches with high interest and low competition on these platforms.

  • iBookstore – The iBookstore is now the #2 digital publishing platform (behind Kindle) but it has about 1/10th of the competition (depending on the niche/category). Amy claims it is easy to make sales on this platform, with no marketing needed.
  • Scribd – Scribd is now a subscription platform similar to Kindle Unlimited and Oyster. Amy says that publishers who place their books on this platform (you can’t do it directly for their subscription program, but Amy shows you how in the training) make easy sales, again with no marketing needed.
The included PPS software does keyword, niche, and competition analysis specifically for these two platforms. The product also includes complete training on how to easily publish to both, as many people have no idea how to get their content into these marketplaces.
 
I hope to review Passive Publishing System here before too long, but because I am currently undergoing some medical treatment time is a bit short at the moment. PPS is currently available at a launch price of just $27. This will be going up to $37 very soon, so it’s definitely a good idea to check out the info page now if you think this product may be of interest to you.
 
With Kindle becoming ever more competitive, and recent changes to Kindle Unlimited potentially making it less remunerative for authors, all e-book writers owe it to themselves to investigate alternative publishing platforms. Kindle is definitely NOT the only game in town now, and in future you may well find that other platforms such as the iBookstore and Scribd (not to mention Udemy) prove more profitable. In any event, they represent additional potential profit streams no entrepreneurial author should ignore!
 
If you have any comments or questions about Passive Publishing System, as ever, please do leave them below.
 
UPDATE MARCH 2016Passive Publishing System has just been updated and relaunched. See my new blog post and review here.
 
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