Three Great Posts on Publishing a Box Set on Amazon

In this post a few weeks ago I discussed the new option for Amazon self-publishers to produce print copies of their Kindle e-books via the KDP dashboard.

At the time I promised to reveal more based on my own experience, but since then I have been sidetracked by two clients offering me loads of work, as well as the growing popularity of my new Pounds and Sense blog.

Anyway, my friend and near-neighbour Sally Jenkins has now published a series of blog posts covering some of the territory I planned to explore myself. So to avoid any further delay, I thought I would share links to her posts here.

Sally’s posts concern how she created a ‘box set’ of her short stories for sale on Amazon in e-book and print versions. That’s interesting in itself – box sets are a hot trend on Amazon – but what caught my attention especially was the fact that she used the new KDP print publishing tool rather than the older Createspace. If you’ve been thinking of doing this as well, therefore, these posts are well worth reading. They are as follows:

Creating an E-book and Paperback Box Set – Part 1

In this introductory post, Sally explains why she decided to produce a box set of three volumes of her short stories in e-book and print form.

Creating an E-book and Paperback Box Set – Part 2

In this post Sally discusses how she created a cover image for her box set, based on a sort of collage of the three existing e-book covers.

Creating an E-book and Paperback Box Set – Part 3

In this post – which personally I found the most interesting – Sally talks about how she published her new box set using the KDP e-book and print publishing tools. She lists the ways in which KDP print publishing differs from Createspace (which she has also used). She also offers some tips and advice for fellow authors thinking of going down this route. For example, she writes:

Product description – this can be copied from the book’s Kindle product description. However, on publication the line breaks may disappear. My description initially appeared as one mass of text. I queried this with Amazon and was advised to manually insert HTML coding to force the line breaks. To do this insert <br> where a line break is required.

It’s all valuable, eye-opening stuff. As I said in my earlier post, the likelihood is that eventually KDP will become Amazon’s main hub for both e-book and print self-publishing. The future for Createspace after that is uncertain. For this reason if no other, then, it’s good to at least take a look at the KDP print publishing tool now. And if you decide to try it yourself, I’m sure you will find Sally’s tips and advice helpful.

For those new to Kindle publishing, incidentally, I highly recommend Geoff Shaw‘s comprehensive Kindling course. Or if you would like a lower-cost alternative, I also recommend Self Publishing on Amazon 2017, a Kindle e-book by Dr Andy Williams I have been reading recently. This covers both Kindle e-book publishing and print publishing on Createspace, although it doesn’t (yet) include print publishing using KDP.

And, of course, if you enjoy reading beautifully written, character-driven short stories, you should definitely check out A Coffee Break Story Collection by Sally Jenkins!

As ever, if you have any comments or questions about this post (or self-publishing on Amazon more generally), please do leave them below.

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